Topcon Unirex  –  Vintage Camera

Topcon Unirex (three quarters with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (three quarters with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (three quarters with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (three quarters with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (front view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (front view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (rear view)

Topcon Unirex (rear view)

Topcon Unirex (top view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (top view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (bottom view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (bottom view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)

Topcon Unirex (with 35mm cassette for scale)

Topcon Unirex (with 35mm cassette for scale)

Topcon Unirex (three quarters with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)Topcon Unirex (three quarters with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)Topcon Unirex (front view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)Topcon Unirex (rear view)Topcon Unirex (top view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)Topcon Unirex (bottom view with UV Topcor 50mm f/2)Topcon Unirex (with 35mm cassette for scale)

Topcon Unirex Specifications

Manufacturer: Tokyo Kogaku K. K.
   
Country of Origin: Japan
   
Made in: Tokyo, Japan
   
Introduced: 1969
   
Camera Type: Single Lens Reflex
   
Lens Mount: UV Topcor Mount
   
Format: 135 Film
   
Dimensions (cm): 14 x 9.4 x 4.3 (body only)
  14 x 9.4 x 8.3 (with lens)

Topcon Unirex Review

The Topcon Unirex is a single lens reflex camera introduced by Tokyo Kogaku in 1969. While not one of the company’s higher end models, the Unirex still carries the high build quality associated with Topcon SLRs.

Unlike many SLRs of its era, the Unirex’s top plate is relatively sparse with only (from left to right) a film rewind knob with a switch at its base that changes the metering mode between A (average) and S (spot), a cold shoe, frame counter, threaded shutter button, and frame advance lever. The bottom plate is similarly bare with only a film rewind release button, tripod socket, compartment for the battery which powers the cadium sulfide light meter, and film door latch.

At roughly five o’clock on the lens mount is a switch between V (ten second self-timer), X (flash synchronization mode used in conjunction with the flash socket at two o’clock), and M (the default setting). Shutter speeds can be set by rotating the ring at the base of the lens mount by moving the black nub attached to it; to change the film speed, the small metal catch on the nub must be pulled outward. The next ring up controls the aperture with an automatic setting that can only be used if one of the red shutter speeds are chosen. The aperture selection ring is also home to a small metal tab which, when depressed, releases the lens from the mount with a counter-clockwise twist. The forwardmost ring is used to focus the lens.

I bought this camera for $20 at a local thrift store. The price was a bit on the high side but once I saw the Topcon name, I knew that it would be worth it. My Unirex seems to be in good working order and very good cosmetic condition with the only real flaws being a few blemishes here and there along with the former owner’s name and social security number scratched into the back.

Want one for yourself? Find your very own Topcon Unirex on eBay.

References:

McKeown, James M. and Joan C. McKeown’s Price Guide to Antique and Classic Cameras, 2001-2002. (Grantsburg: Centennial Photo Service, 2001), 638.

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